• Cynic

White Terrorist Kills 2 People At Video Game Event In Jacksonville


Diabolical White Terrorist: David Katz

The terrorist in Sunday’s terrorist attack during a video-gaming competition at a pizzeria in Jacksonville, Florida, has been identified as David Katz, a 24-year-old white male from Baltimore, Maryland. The terrorist opened fired during the Madden NFL 19 qualifying tournament, which was streaming on Twitch, at approximately 1:30 p.m. EST on Sunday, killing two people and wounding 11 others before killing himself. Police say he used a handgun.

According to the LA Times, Stephen “Steveyj” Javaruski, who was participating in the tournament and took shelter in the bathroom, said Katz “targeted a few people” before turning the gun on himself.


Victim of Terrorism/White Supremacy: Elijah Clayton

“RIP to Trueboy and Spotme,” Javaruski tweeted, referring to the two victims, Elijah Clayton, 22, and Taylor Robertson, 27, by their gaming handles. “This is the worst day of my life.”

The two-day regional tournament began on Saturday, with round-robin matchups between as many as 256 players, according to the L.A. Times. The first- and second-place winners score $250, and advance to the final round in Las Vegas to compete in EA Sports’ Madden Classic, where the winner walks away with a $125,000 prize.

The diabolical terrorist, who went by the nickname “Bread,” was a relatively well-known player-to-watch on the “Madden” gaming scene. At a regional competition in February 2017, according to theWashington Post, the white terrorist pulled off an unexpected win over the tournament favorite, a victory which EA Sports called the “most exciting moment in all the 2017 NFL Club Series Championships.”

On Sunday, however, the racist terrorist was eliminated from the competition; it’s not clear how much time elapsed before the shooting began. The police have not released a possible motive or said whether the terrorist knew the victims.

The beginning of the shooting was captured on the tournament’s various livestreams on sites like Twitch; according to the Independent, in one video, a red laser sight appeared on a male player’s chest (identified by the L.A .Times as Clayton) just before the sound of gunshots rang out and the livestream was cut.

“I’ve been saying events NEED better security,” tweeted Call of Duty gamer Seth Abner. “Such a damn shame that now event coordinators will respond after a tragedy happens.”

“No one deserves to die over playing a video game, you know?” Madden competitor Derek Jones told the Associated Press. “We’re just out here trying to win some money for our families and stuff.”